ALL ABOUT THE REGENCY VILLAGE, REGENCY BRUIN
& MAJESTIC CREST THEATRES

Event begins at:

Regency Village Theatre
961 Broxton
Los Angeles, CA. 90024

Ends at the

Majestic Crest Theatre
1262 Westwood
Los Angeles, CA. 90024

Regency Village Theater
Courtesy of Cinema Treasures

Also known as Village Theater, Fox Westwood Village, Mann Village Theatre
961 Broxton Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90024 United States(map)
Status: Open
Screens: Single Screen
Style: Mission Revival
Function: Movies (First Run)
Seats: 1341
Chain: Regency Theatres
Architect: Percy Parke Lewis

The Village Theater in Westwood opened on August 14, 1931 with a Spanish Mission style decoration (a la Carthay Circle Theater, Fox Arlington Theater, Fox Florence Theater). The Village Theater was remodeled in the late-1940's-early 1950's and gold swirls were added near the stage areas, along with upgrades for the exits, lobby and new seats and carpet were added.

The California Gold Rush artwork in the lobby was added. (You can see the same artwork in a few other Fox houses in Southern California like El Portal Theater (North Hollywood), California Theater (Huntington Park).) The artwork near the restrooms, was also added during the renovations. Before that remodel there was a small patio outside. The artwork covers this area now. The stage area was damaged and changed between 1931-1940. Dressing rooms and storage areas were walled off from use. The Village Theater stayed the same until the late 1970's (except for the new CinemaScope equipment in the 1950's).

For "The Deer Hunter" engagement, the Village Theater got new 70mm projection equipment, a new larger screen, and a new main title waterfall curtain. The old screen was half as tall as it is today. The theater also got a new, less flattering carpet in the early-1980's.

Fortunately, the "Fox" tower sign was refurbished in the late-1980's.

The last remodel was around 1998-99, when the Village Theater got new seats and carpet. The Village Theater seated 1,480 people before the 1950's remodel. After the 1950's remodel it seated 1,535. With the last remodel it lost seats for (handicap areas/new wider seats). It seats 1,341 people now.

After more than sixty years as a first run movie palace, the Village Theater is still one of the sites of Hollywood's biggest movie premieres.

In August 2009, Mann Theatres announced the company will no longer operate the Village Theater as of March 2010, and Regency Theatres took over the lease from April 1, 2010.

Regency Bruin Theatre
Contributed by Cinema Treasures

948 Broxton Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90024
Status: Open
Screens: Single Screen
Style: Art Moderne
Function: Movies (First Run)
Seats: 696
Chain: Regency Theatres
Architect: S. Charles Lee

Bruin Theatre was opened in 1937 with 670 seats. This is a small, but elegant theater, that is often seen in the backdrop of movie premieres taking place across the street at the Village Theater. Its wrap-around marquee can be seen from all four streets which intesect at the theater. Sadly, the theater's auditorium murals that once glowed in the dark have been painted over. As of 2009, the seating capacity is listed as 696.

Mann Theatres announced in August 2009, that the company will no longer operate the Bruin Theatre as of March 2010, and Regency Theatres took over the lease from April 1, 2010.

Majestic Crest Theatre
Contributed by Cinema Treasures

Also known as Westwood, UCLAN, Metro, Pacific Crest, Crest, Westwood Crest
1262 Westwood Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90024
Status: Open
Screens: Single Screen
Style: Art Moderne
Function: Movies (First Run)
Seats: 500
Chain: Independent
Architect: Arthur W. Hawes

Opened in December 1940 as the UCLAN Theatre, a live theatre. An Art Moderne masterpiece on a neighborhood scale, the Crest Theatre was, with its smaller sister, the El Capitan across town, the crown jewels of the Pacific Theater chain, which formerly operated it. Recently renovated and restored with wondrous black-light enhanced wall murals and twinkling ceiling stars, the Crest Theatre is a show every time.

Before the start of each film, music blares, lights illuminate the curtains and shooting stars fly across the small ceiling. The Crest Theatre is a small, stylish and essential theater just below Wilshire in Westwood.

On May 14, 2008, the Majestic Crest Theatre was designated an Historic-Cultural Monument by the City of Los Angeles.

Majestic Crest Theatre History
(from the website)

The Majestic Crest has a long and fascinating history as one of the true landmark single screen theatres in the country. By 2002, sagging box office returns and an overzealous landowner almost brought an end to the magic. The cinema was in danger of being converted into an adult film venue, a swap meet site, or a church. In the face of these events, a single-screen theatre owner from the community, Robert Bucksbaum, purchased the building and arranged to take over theatre operations from Pacific in January 2003.

Like many Westwood residents, Robert was frustrated over the loss of several screens in the community and didn’t want his favorite theatre following the same route. Robert currently spends several hours a day at the theatre, greeting customers and conducting raffles on weekends. He is committed to maintaining the Crest’s standing as one of the top destination locations in Los Angeles. When Robert took over the operation of the Crest on January 1, 2003, the first movie to debut was Roman Polanski’s acclaimed Holocaust drama “The Pianist.”

The Crest was first constructed in 1941 by Frances Seymour Fonda, the second wife of Henry Fonda and mother of Peter and Jane Fonda. Originally intended as a showcase for live theater, the onset of World War II brought with it the need for a venue where local residents could watch newsreels about the battles happening overseas. Soon after it adopted the ‘UCLAN Theatre’ moniker in reference to the nearby university, and then eventually settled on the Crest.

In the 1970s it was temporarily renamed the Metro, and MGM made minor design changes. But when Pacific took control in 1985, it was renamed the Pacific Crest and a long-standing partnership with Disney began. “Three Men and a Baby” was the first film the studio premiered. But more renovations were needed. The auditorium was reconfigured, the screen was brought forward, new curtains were put up, a new marquee was designed, and the wall cyclorama was assembled. After all of these updates, the Bette Midler-Lily Tomlin comedy “Big Business” debuted at the Crest.

All but two buildings on the wall mural are real establishments from Westwood and Hollywood during the 1940s; Bill’s Chili was named after the theatre’s then-manager, and Rick’s was named for the construction manager. The music prologue before each show is “That’s Entertainment,” performed by John Williams and the Boston Pops. The ceiling’s starlights are celestially accurate; a photograph was taken outside San Diego in the fall of 1987, and gridded accordingly. The shooting star is just a little “Hollywood magic.”

 

Attend to learn more about the the Regency Village,
Regency Bruin & Majestic Crest Theatres!

 

 

Saturday, April 17th, 9:15am
Doors open at 9:00am

 

ALL ABOUT
THE REGENCY VILLAGE, REGENCY BRUIN & MAjESTIC CREST THEATRES

The Public is Invited

Plentiful parking in
Westwood

Event begins at:

Regency Village Theatre
961 Broxton
Los Angeles, CA. 90024

Ends at the

Majestic Crest Theatre
1262 Westwood
Los Angeles, CA. 90024

 

A free, comprehensive history presentation and insider’s tour of three beloved landmark historic theatres A chance to see and appreciate these theatres as never before…

Join a public display of affection for this great neighborhood theatre.

Come celebrate Regency Theatres’ recent salvation of the Village and Bruin and learn about their rich histories - including several “face-lifts”.

Take an insider’s tour to generally forbidden off-limits areas. Then, walk over to the Majestic Crest – slightly detouring ento say hello to Marilyn Monroe and friends – and discover how this former legit house reinvented itself via Disney, Pacific Theatres, and Robert Bucksbaum.

Three amazing single screen historic theatres, a cemetery chockfull of the famous and dead, and a chance to rediscover Westwood - all in one Saturday morning!

Here’s a 5 minute video tour of the these Westwood theatres
CLICK HERE

HISTORIES – researched and presented by theatre historian Ed Kelsey. See how the Village, Bruin and Majestic Crest have changed over the years. What’s original? What’s Skouras? What’s Disney? Hear the stories of these great theatres from their beginnings through today.

BEHIND-THE-SCENES – get a real insider’s tour.

DISCOVER – how you can support the continuing successful operation of these historic gems.

EDUCATE & ADVOCATE – find out how you can become actively involved in LAHTF’s ongoing theatre preservation work around SoCal. Brief updates on the Friends of the Fairfax, Inglewood Fox Theatre Alliance, the Grauman’s Chinese, Golden Gate, Atlantic, and LA’s Broadway Theatres.

To see photos of the Fox Inglewood CLICK HERE

For more information about this theater. CLICK HERE


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